Letters to The Editor

So New Mexico Democrats question the Bush administration’s evidence against Iraq do they? I wonder why?
The Democrats voted for the war resolution because of polls. They turned against it when foreign leftists screamed in the streets.
They were for the war when it was a brilliant success. And now that it is making hay for the president (as it should), they are against it again.
What leadership.
The war with Iraq was not only just, it was critical. Events of 9-11 woke up most Americans, even if the Dems are still asleep.
Thank God for George W. Bush in office.

Sharon Faulkner
Portales

The recent letter from Kirby Rowan conserving Gordon Greaves, the former editor of the News-Tribune and former board member of the Roosevelt General Hospital, left much to be desired with respect to clarity.
Perhaps since I was a close associate of Gordon’s, some further information might be of value.
I left the Army in 1955 and assumed the job of radiologist at Roosevelt General Hospital in May, 1955. I met Gordon right away, and, since he was both editor and a hospital board member, we used to have an informal cup of coffee three or four times a month just to keep in touch. Since we also discussed things other than the hospital, I soon learned that he was a Franklin Delano Roosevelt new dealer. I was originally, before being drafted in the Army, a Lyndon-Johnson type Democrat from Scott and White Clinic at Temple, Texas.
Gordon was a fair man. One thing that upset him was when FDR stated the Democrats would be in control for years to come because FDR created so many voters who are dependant on government programs.
Lyndon Johnson tried to further solidify this voter base with his great society. This is when Gordon Greaves — an honest man with integrity — realized that the government was not the solver of all our problems but might be our biggest enemy.
He did not use terms like “inanity, endure, etc.” which classify a closed mind, but was willing to listen to every one of us.

Martin B. Goodwin
Portales

Thank you for last week’s series of stories on our water problem.
This quote from the series is significant: “What we need to realize is that this is a vast underground reserve that is being depleted through ground-water mining, and it’s only a matter of time before the aquifer will be diminished to the point that it can’t be used for irrigated agriculture, and sometime beyond that, there will be places that dry up entirely.”
Plus or minus 10 years, that point is upon us.
The only feasible way to fix this situation over the next 25 years is to limit irrigation agriculture. We can do it deliberately, which will be hard, or we will have it forced upon us, which will be harder.
My only solution is that we bite the bullet and make the choices sooner rather than later.

Kirby Rowan
Portales