Meadors enjoyed finer things

By Laurie Stone: PNT Correspondent

J. E. Meadors enjoyed the finer things of life.
A carpenter by trade, he made candlesticks, cabinets and homes — but his most important treasures were those built through friendship.
Family members said he lived by the belief that helping people was more important than focusing on yourself.
Meadors grew up poor during the depression, to help his family, he worked in the fields rather than going to school.
Vannette Field, Meadors daughter, said her father wanted to make things better so he worked towards it without complaining which defined his character throughout life.
“The fruit of love was very evident in his life,” she said. “He wasn’t wealthy, but he was generous. He gave so much to people, I felt that I could never ‘out give’ him when following in his example,” Field said.
J.E. Meadors died November 8, 2004.
He enjoyed fishing, dancing and being with his family.
Richard Meadors, J. E. Meadors’ son, said his father instilled within him a strong work ethic because he believed that you give a man an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay.
“He was unique from our point of view,” Richard said. “He was a man of integrity, honest and was always positive no matter how bad things were.”
J.E. Meadors was born on March 15, 1919, in Mart, Texas, to Lee and H.T. Meadors.
He grew up in the Waco, Texas area near Elk, Texas. He served during World War II in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He married Mary Dell Phillips on Dec. 20, 1943, in Urbana, Ill.
They farmed for a short time in Childress, and on a trip to California, they stopped in Carlsbad, where he accepted a job as an apprentice carpenter. He later joined the Carpenter’s Union, of which he was a member for 47 years. He worked as a carpenter throughout New Mexico for more than 30 years before retiring in 1983. After retiring, he continued doing side jobs until four years ago.