Blessings come with prayers

By Joan Clayton: Religion columnist

We may never know where or how our prayers are answered, but be assured they are. I was privileged to know an answered prayer that happened in a doctor’s office many years ago.

“Have a seat, and the doctor will be with you shortly,” the young receptionist said.

She then answered the telephone with her cheery voice. Immediately she screamed, wailing in severe pain, crying her heart out. The doctor came running in and learned the young lady’s mother had just been taken to emergency room, not expected to survive. Boldness came over me, and I politely asked the doctor if I could take the young lady to an empty room and pray for her.

“Of course,” the doctor answered. I put my arms around the girl, and in the empty room, I prayed for her mother and the young lady. I just simply prayed and left the rest to the Lord. She seemed to be comforted and hurried to the hospital.

Recently, we entered a restaurant, and I heard someone say, “There’s Mrs. Clayton.” A beautiful woman ran to me with her elderly mother behind her.

“Do you remember me, Mrs. Clayton? You were the one who prayed for my mother and me in the doctor’s office years ago. I want you to meet my mother!”

I burst into tears, and they did, too. As they left the restaurant, her mother looked back and said to me, “God answers prayers.”

I’m sure there were others praying for the girl’s mother, too, but I was at the right place at the right time. After many years had occurred, I saw the woman I had prayed for with possible others who had prayed, too.

I’m reminded of the scripture in Psalm 34:17: “The righteous cry out, and the LORD hears them: he delivers them from all their troubles” (NIV).

We see the importance and seriousness of praying for others in 1 Samuel 12:23: “As for me, far be it from me that I should sin against the LORD by failing to pray for you. And I will teach you the way that is good and right” (NIV).

Praying for others is one of the most unselfish things we can do. Life is too complicated with too many ups and downs to try to make it alone.

When prayers go up, blessings come down. I have found there’s an everlasting “Light” in the depths of despair. A light bursts forth, displaying God’s path to the deliverance of troubled souls.

I have also discovered the human heart will never rest until it trusts completely in the One who died at Calvary.

It’s a privilege to pray for others with love and faith. Think of the most difficult situation in your life. That is the easiest thing for God to handle if not blocked by doubt and unbelief. Your faith and belief in God is the greatest thing you can pass on to your heirs as an inheritance.

I have often said, “If you want a miracle, ask a child to pray for you.” Their faith is awesome. One of my students once came to school saying, “Teacher, I prayed for you last night. I asked the Lord to keep you.”

He didn’t know my mother was seriously ill, but his childlike faith gave me comfort. Children are like flowers in the gardens of our hearts.

When our youngest grandson was about 6, I asked him what he would do to solve the earth’s problems.

He simply said, “Pray!”

Prayer is a lifesaver in a sea of troubled waters.

Pray for someone today. It is vital to all of us.

Portales resident Joan Clayton is a retired teacher and published author. Her e-mail address is: joan@yucca.net