Baxter Black: Work ethic backbone of America

By Baxter Black: On the edge of common sense

“A good day’s work is a good day’s work.”

Labor Day 2010 finds us with our head down, shoulders to the wheel, noses to the grindstone and 10 percent unemployment.

The high unemployment is not because we don’t know how to work. We do!

The proof is our high productivity per capita. Today we are getting the same job done as before, but with less people. Our country still has the work ethic that brought the working class Europeans and Asians to our shores. It’s what still draws immigrants to America. Mexican illegals don’t come here because of free health care, unemployment benefits, or a welfare system. They come here to work.

America’s democratic republic encourages capitalism and entrepreneurship, which invest in growth, which is achieved by putting workers to work.

European nations, primarily socialist leaning governments, discourage individual achievement, in trade for government care for the masses. It reaches its extreme when the government finally concedes they have spent themselves into bankruptcy and collapse like Russia after the Cold War and Greece last spring.

It is pointed out regularly in the news that in contrast to the struggling workers in the private sector, government workers are increasing in numbers, wealth and security. Our neighbor to the south has always had a class system; the ricos (rich), the government workers, and the peones.

The core of the Mexican middle class are the government employees. It appears to me it is the same in many developing countries like China and India. The governments are afraid to trust the people … the workers.

America has gotten itself in financial trouble with the combination of well-meaning irresponsible politicians and bankers who wouldn’t stand up to them. We continue to try and spend ourselves out of debt by increasing the workers’ taxes.

Our greatest saving grace is that we as a people know how to work.

Generations before us have pulled themselves out of the doldrums of worldwide conflict, natural disasters, invasions and floundering politicians.

Somehow, when we crash and burn we always seem to come back stronger and better; personally, as a people, and as a nation. That history is where I turn to for inspiration. That and the backbone and perseverance that I see every day in my fellow workers.