Government meddling not helping

Kent McManigal

Kent McManigal

When judging whether you should do more of something, or even continue to do it at all, a necessary step is to look at the results your actions have produced so far.

After more than a century of government schooling —“public education” — illiteracy is at crisis levels in America. Another century of letting government control education and today’s texting generation may be literacy’s “good old days” by comparison.

After a century of ever-escalating anti-gun laws, the least dangerous places are still those that have avoided the most restrictive regulations. The most restrictive locations keep getting less safe.

Because of strife between the races, government imposed laws that violated the right of association, particularly that policy called “affirmative action,” and caused the strife between the races to begin heating up again. For decades now, about the only racial problems are those directly created by government intervention.

President Lyndon Johnson declared a war on poverty and imposed policies that made poverty practically hereditary and almost impossible for those being “helped” to escape. Poverty is winning that war.

After several decades of drug prohibition, approximately the same percentage of people are addicted to forbidden substances, and the laws are driving the drugs to grow ever more dangerous.

Here in the midst of the post-9/11 security mania, Americans are less free at home and less safe when venturing out into the rest of the world. And there have never been more people around the world willing to kill or die to strike a blow at the U.S. government, which they mistake for Americans.

After handing control of the money supply over to the Federal Reserve 100 years ago, the U.S. dollar has lost 95 percent of its value. Inflation isn’t normal; it is the consequence of the Federal Reserve’s accelerating counterfeiting operation that floods the economy with more dollars every year — each of which makes the dollar in your hand worth just a little less.

How is all that “help” working for you?

Of course, when proposing to interfere, you also need to examine whether plans will violate the rightful liberty of any person, or violate property rights in any way. If it will, you shouldn’t do it.

It leaves me wondering how anyone can imagine that socializing medical care will have an effect opposite to that of state intervention in every other area?

 Farwell’s Kent McManigal champions liberty. Contact him at:

dullhawk@hotmail.com

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