On the shelves — May 11

The following books are available for checkout:

Clovis-Carver Library
Dog Breeds 101: Your In-Depth Guide to Man’s Best Friend St. Bernard to Thai Ridgeback by K. Tamura will help prospective dog owners find the best pet for their homes and lifestyles, with information on the history, breeding, activities, health, and temperament of a long-term companion that will essentially become a member of the family.
That’s a Good Dog: Dog Breeds of the Working Group by Beatriz Scaglia describes the characteristics of St. Bernards and other dogs that are bred not merely as pets, but as working dogs that can be trained to work cattle, perform search and rescue, assist the disabled, protect owners and their and property, and provide therapy for the elderly or injured.
New and Improved How to Train and Understand Your Saint Bernard Puppy or Dog by Vince Stead offers practical guidance for raising a puppy, how to crate train it, stop inappropriate behavior, feed the best diet in the right amount, and care for the health and grooming of one of the most lovable dogs you will ever own.
The three books above were given by Dr. James B. Moss in memory of Juanita Jacobs

Ripper” by Isabel Allende centers on Amanda Jackson, a teen-aged, natural-born sleuth who is addicted to crime novels and to Ripper, the online mystery game that she plays with her grandfather; but when her mother suddenly vanishes Amanda must solve a real murder and the most complex mystery she has ever faced before it is too late.
Nicholson: A Biography” by Marc Eliot sheds new light on Jack Nicholson: a man with one of the most iconic and fascinating careers — and lives — in Hollywood, from his working-class childhood in New Jersey to movie sets through his fifty-year career in film.
Carthage” by Joyce Carol Oates plunges deep into the psyche of a wounded Iraq war veteran who is haunted by his memories of unspeakable acts of wartime aggression and who is linked to the disappearance of a young girl who vanishes into the wilds of the Adirondacks.
I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban” by Malala Yousafzai is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism; a young girl’s fight for her right to education; and the parents who, in a society that prizes sons, encouraged their daughter to write and attend school..

Portales Public Library
Midnight Crossroad

By: Charlaine Harris
Welcome to Midnight, Texas, a pretty standard dried-up western town. It’s a town with many boarded-up windows and few full-time inhabitants, located at the crossing of Witch Light Road and the Davy highway. There’s a diner, though people just passing through tend not to linger; a pawnshop where someone who lives in the basement is only seen at night; and then there’s new resident Manfred Bernardo, who thinks he’s found the perfect place to work in private but has secrets of his own. Everything looks normal when you stop at the one traffic light in town, but stay awhile, and you’ll learn the truth.

Jo Frost’s Toddler Rules: Your 5-Step Guide to Shaping Proper Behavior
By: Jo Frost
Jo Frost has always had a natural gift for helping parents navigate milestones with practical know-how and ease and for connecting with kids. With the success of her hit TV shows, she’s proven her ability to expertly rein in unacceptable behavior and bring peace and stability to millions of homes world-wide. In this invaluable book, she shows you how to identify and eliminate toddler tantrums and curb conduct in other child rearing areas. Frost’s effective five-step program for disciplined parenting addresses such challenges as sleep, food, play, learning, and manners. Complete with troubleshooting tips for living tantrum-free, this honest, welcome, straightforward guide has all you need to help your children grow, thrive, and make family time even more precious.

What the Moon Said
By: Gayle Rosengren
Esther knows some tricks for avoiding bad luck thanks to her superstitious mother such as: toss salt over your left shoulder, never button your shirt crooked, and avoid black cats, but even luck can’t keep her family safe from the Depression. Esther’s family leaves their comfy Chicago life behind for a farm in Wisconsin when Pa loses his job. Living on a farm means a lot of hard work, but that also means there are plenty of opportunities for Esther to show her mother how helpful she can be. She loves all of the animals and even better, makes a fast friend in Bethany. But then Ma sees a sign that Esther just knows is wrong. How can it be good luck if believing a superstition makes you miserable?