All about food storage

By Lillian Bowe
Staff writer
lbowe@pntonline.com

Cora Stroud, an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, knows the importance of being prepared for a disaster. Stroud knows how to prepare a three-day emergency kit with water, food and other supplies.

This was one of the reasons she decided to start a class on food storage at the end of May.

Every Thursday at her church, Stroud has organized classes which include various lessons on emergency preparedness, dehydrating food, canning meat and learning how to utilize different grain in people’s diets.

Lillian Bowe: Staff photo Cora Stroud sets up the different grains that will be featured in the next Food Storage 101 class on Thursday at the Latter Day Saints Cultural Hall. Stroud said the class will mainly be about gluten-free grains.

Lillian Bowe: Staff photo
Cora Stroud sets up the different grains that will be featured in the next Food Storage 101 class on Thursday at the Latter Day Saints Cultural Hall. Stroud said the class will mainly be about gluten-free grains.

This is the first year Stroud has taught the class, and she said it is going well. Stroud said there are about 20 people who attend, split evenly between members of her church and community members.

“I want to teach skills that are relevant and are very useful for self-sustainability,” Stroud said.

Stroud and her husband John have four children. Stroud is the former owner of a retail store and her husband was a farmer. They retired in 2001 and now own A1 Self Storage.

Why did you start these classes?
I am the food service person at our church and I teach about food storage and many other topics about food to our church. I thought it would be a good public service for the community if I had an open class. The class is open to anyone and it will go year-round. It is also not a requirement to attend all the meetings.

What has been your favorite class so far?
It has to be the emergency preparedness class. We taught how to make an emergency kit for 72 hours. The church teaches this to our members as well. My daughter also demonstrated how to make a burner from an Altoids can. The burner would last for two-and-half hours and could boil water in 11 minutes. It was a really interesting demonstration and very helpful.

How long have you been part of your church? What duties do you have?
I joined in 1972. I am the program chairman of the church, which I print out the program for the church service. Also, I am the historian for the church. Sometimes I am a substitute teacher for the classes if they need me. My favorite thing is working with the food service and food storage. I get to teach people important things about food and how to be prepare for emergencies.

What are some future classes?
Our next class after the grains will be about jams and jellies. We also have classes on preserving fruits, dehydrating food, water education and gardening.

Outside of church and the class, what does the Stroud couple do with its time?
We got a few storage units after we retired and we do a lot of community work. That keeps us pretty busy. I also have a garden I tend and the food I grow I also canned. I have put a few of my cans into the fair, and one year I won $96. There are a lot of things you can enter into the fair and it is a lot of fun.